Guiding Principles for Land Management

The Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian people have a connection to the land. We revered and utilized the forests and the coastlines of southeast Alaska. Just as long as the forest has been here there have been people. Each takes care of the other.

Guiding Principles for Sealaska Land Management

  • Alignment with Core Native Values (Values In Action) - We will have a sustainable harvest plan such that timber can be harvested in perpetuity and old growth will be harvested, as the bridge to viable second growth and the harvesting of other private lands (within 15-20 years)
  • Maximizing Value Creation - We will endeavor to maximize value creation by reassessing the whole value chain of the timber harvesting operation with the objective to maximize profits from the volume harvested and maximize the economic benefit to the economy of SE Alaska
  • Maximizing Benefits From Unique Land - We will fully assess other ways to create value from our unique land asset –carbon, wetland mitigation, harvesting, and tourism –through partnerships with experts who have demonstrated success. We will then ensure appropriate leadership for management of this land asset, considering the skills required to execute on these opportunities

Sealaska takes good care of its land and strives to be a good neighbor in the Tongass National Forest. Thank you for taking the time to learn about our story. We are Alaska’s first people, making our way in today’s world.

Our Native values, observed for thousands of years, include caring for the land so future generations can benefit. Sealaska practices stewardship for the future. We exceed land management standards and regulatory requirements. We do this by utilizing proven techniques. Sealaska's partners help us author and implement cutting edge science. Over two decades of research have guided our vision and practice of land stewardship. Every single acre of harvested land is carefully reforested. Management of Sealaska lands provides critically important benefits for our shareholders and the ecosystem. Managing timber maintains wildlife habitat and healthy salmon streams. Our shareholders enjoy traditional uses of the land while realizing its commercial benefits. 

Sealaska takes good care of its land and strives to be a good neighbor in the Tongass National Forest. Thank you for taking the time to learn about our story.