Sealaska Timber, Successfully Overcomes Transition Year in 2015

Sealaska Timber would like to sustain in perpetuity harvest levels to maintain nearly 600 jobs and millions in payroll and infrastructure dollars that Southeast communities rely on.

Before Congress and the president approved House Resolution 3979, which included the Sealaska land entitlement bill, Sealaska Timber and contractors were uncertain if Sealaska would be in the timber industry in 2015.

“The law passed in the eleventh hour—literally as we were forced into considering shutting down operations at Sealaska Timber,” said Anthony Mallott, Sealaska president and CEO. “We have spent the last year strategizing to ensure a consistent smaller timber program can achieve profitability and sustainability and be a meaningful industry for our rural communities.”

The timing of the land legislation was one of Sealaska Timber’s greatest challenges. “We were elated when the legislation passed but had to shift into overdrive, achieving permitting and planning 2015 operations that would have otherwise been performed far earlier,” said Mallott. “We effectively did two years of operations in one, while also preparing long-term strategic plans.”

Sealaska Timber would like to sustain in perpetuity harvest levels to maintain nearly 600 jobs and millions in payroll and infrastructure dollars that Southeast communities rely on.

"Meaningful jobs, educational scholarships, land stewardship programs, environmental quality monitoring, cultural programs and shareholder dividends are all tied to this important rural industry,” said Mallott. “2015 was an extraordinary transition year that achieved profitability and set the foundation for 2016 as a new start. 2017 and beyond will solidify our model for sustained harvest and allow other land uses outside of a timber harvest.”

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